Starlink with Pi router pihole not working

I don't think you'll be able to bypass the router itself?

Yeah, that sounds right.

What have you tried? How have you attempted to set up Pi-hole?

You can, but they do not make it easy and according to them, not through wifi:

https://support.starlink.com/topic?category=10

Can I add a 3rd party router or mesh system?

Yes, you are welcome to connect your own equipment to Starlink. However, we cannot guarantee Starlink performance or compatibility with 3rd party routers or mesh systems. Additionally, the Starlink App may not work as expected when using 3rd party routers.

Circular_500x500.png Please be aware that the Starlink router does not have a router bypass mode. If you use your own router or mesh system, we recommend physically bypassing the included Starlink router and using the 3rd party equipment exclusively with the power supply. We do not recommend using Starlink in a dual LAN system.
Rectangular_500x500.png To connect a 3rd party router or mesh system, you will need to purchase the Ethernet Adapter from the Starlink Shop to allow for a wired connection to the network.Bypass mode can be enabled via the Starlink App under "Settings". Bypass mode will completely disable the built-in Starlink WiFi router functionality. An Ethernet Adapter is required to use this feature. A manual factory reset is required to reverse the setting.We are actively working on development of a Starlink mesh product.

Now that I have read up on it:

You can buy whatever Musk wants you to buy and fight to get your router to play nice with Starlink.
Or:
you can set up your pi-hole using the wifi from Starlink and if Starlink will not let you assign the DNS to your pi-hole, manually configure every device to its IP address.
My pi-hole is not using Ethernet and it is fine.

Good luck.

At the moment I am using a wifi link to the Starlink router, and the ethernet link to a temporary lan. Th e Pi is a separate down stream from the Starlink router.

When everything is working the way I want it to, I will bypass the Starlink router and use the Pi as the router for my full lan.

Several times. Pihole is installed, but I cannot figure out what addresses to use.

That is what I am doing at the moment with my work lan at the moment. I am trying for a way to not have to go into every device and adjust the DNS individually.

I suppose that I could use 2 Pis, but using 1 would be nicer.

It sounds like you need the Pi to act as a gateway between the Starlink and Pi-hole, which may be what you were trying to do. Let the Starlink use whatever DHCP it has to assign the Pi an WLAN address (and DNS) in one one subnet and let the Pi run a DHCP for the other subnet with the gateway passing packets between the subnets. In the instructions below, you could ignore the part of "Configuring DHCP Server" if you enable DHCP in Pi-hole. The static for eth0 for the Pi should be the IP address for Pi-hole.

Or is your issue that you want to override the DNS for wireless devices that connect to eventually to Starlink. Then, you may need another wireless gateway with DHCP, which could be wired to the Pi using the above. Not sure if you can do a wireless to wireless gateway with a Pi. Two Pi's back to back feels totally conceivable.

After some "research," maybe add a USB WiFi dongle to the Pi. Then, you have two wireless interfaces, which should make a wireless to wireless gateway possible.

I have my Pi acting as a router between the Starlink and my experimental lan now.
I have:

Starlink(192.168.1.1) wifi (192.168.1.203) Pi (192.168.2.1) eth0 (192.168.2.x)

which works. any device on the 192.168.2.x can use the internet. There is no problem with the Pi as a router.

What I want to do is install pihole on the Pi so the devices on the 192.168.2.x will not see ads.

As for lan wifi, I have a Brostrend wifi

[quote="Blockhead, post:15, topic:54456"]
The static for eth0 for the Pi should be the IP address for Pi-hole.
extender/access point installed, and my iPad works fine. The hardware is installed and working fine.

I used the web page you referenced as my guide to setting up the base system.

I'm still unsure of where you're getting the DHCP from in each subnet. You could download a tool or app to give you that information, preferably from a device that is connected to Internet. There is a link to a Windows tool on this page: GitHub - CyberShadow/dhcptest: Cross-platform DHCP test client

It will return the DHCP responses, including the DHCP server identifier (Option 54) and the DNS addresses (Option 6). Then, keep working it until there is only one DHCP server returning the DNS address of the Pi for Options 54 and 6. This is to confirm there is no rogue network intercepting your attempt to access the Pi by putting your device on a different network.

And there is always the option of "pihole debug" and giving the pihole developers the debug link.

Starlinks address is 1.1, the only client it has is your pi using its wifi with an address assigned by Starlink: 1.203.
You have only one wired connection coming from the Pi going to your extender/AP (they are not interchangeable and since the it is wired it is AP) The lan side of the Pi which should be ETH0 is 2.1. That is its router address. That is the address your AP gets when it is plugged.

What you need is a virtual lan port and then install pi-hole and give it a static address using that address...
I do not know if that can be done.

You may be able to go into Local DNS settings/local dns records, give the pi-hole a domain enter an Ip address and assign that ip address to the pi-hole install, but that is me just brainstorming. I doubt that would work.

Maybe, but how does the router forward packets sent to it, to be handled by it, to software that is that is concurrently handling packets on the same IP address?

Seems like a loop at best: Client wants DNS lookup, my DNS server is me.
I mean, how? How does the router reconcile that?

There are two sequential DHCP servers. Pi then Starlink.

This is what I understand as happening:

As far as Starlink is concerned, Pi is just another client. So the laptop 192.168.2.53 is forwarded to Starlink as (say) 192.168.1.203:something which then forwarded to the next link as 100.90.96.182:somethingelse.

You are likely right.

I have a Pi 3 sitting around. I'll make it a pihole server for now, and then see if there is a way fold the two together later.

Yes.

You are double natted.
Starlink cannot see anything behind your R-P router. It only sees devices connected directly to it.
Double natted is a whole issue that may or may not cause issues; but it has nothing to do with what you trying to do.
Pi3 has WIFI and most tutorials use Ethernet.
I don't: I run Pi-hole on a P2zw and works fine with WIFI. My first hole was on a Pzw and worked just fine too...

I'm not sure of the questions at this point, but that's OK. I'll keep asking questions and maybe I'll learn something new.
I don't see a loop. The Starlink/WiFi part here doesn't seem relevant to me.

Let's assume the Pi has an address on a network, like 192.168.2.1.

The Pi could certainly use pihole's DNS itself, as noted in the Post Install section, "If your OS uses dhcpcd for network configuration, you can add to your /etc/dhcpcd.conf
static domain_name_servers=127.0.0.1"

Also, assume the DHCP in the network provides the Pi's address as the DNS server and DHCP server. A computer connects and is assigned 192.168.2.53. To use DNS, packets sent with source of 192.168.2.53 would send a DNS packet on port 53 to the destination in the 192.168.2.1 in the network, and 192.168.2.1 would reply to 192.168.2.53. So, no loop.

Packets with destinations other than 192.168.2.1 could be forwarded even if an intermediate hop is 192.168.2.1, right? Or, I think.

I told them double natted had nothing to do with what they were trying to do.

The Pi, that is now configured as their router using Raspian Bullseye, would send the packet to its own IP address I do not think it matters it is sent on port53 because it is sent back out to the network. It is not like the router can say, "some software on my machine is sharing my ip address so I'll forward this to the software using my IP address in the DNS settings".

Imagine you configured the router to send to pi-holes IP address, normally that would be a different IP address to send to. But it is not. it is the same address running on the same hardware with the same MAC as the router.
If what are suggesting worked, he would not need the router, pi-hole would be the router.

I said I could be wrong. But I did look around and people that love Raspberry Pis, have used OpenWRT (with smart switches, since the pi only one LAN port or, minimally, a usb to Ethernet dongle). on a Pi and set up separate Pi-holes have not published anything about using both on the same machine.

well lookie there.

Actually, There is another thread that the guy got it running. I put the link in the Starlink thread.

Using a Raspberry as a Linux Router with Pi-Hole

[

Using a Raspberry as a Linux Router with Pi-Hole

Hi, This morning I re-installed a pi-hole and I'm trying to set up my raspberry as a Linux router. Here's my h...

](Using a Raspberry as a Linux Router with Pi-Hole)

Blockhead
March 24

I'm not sure of the questions at this point, but that's OK. I'll keep asking questions and maybe I'll learn something new.
I don't see a loop. The Starlink/WiFi part here doesn't seem relevant to me.

Let's assume the Pi has an address on a network, like 192.168.2.1.

The Pi could certainly use pihole's DNS itself, as noted in the Post Install section, "If your OS uses dhcpcd for network configuration, you can add to your /etc/dhcpcd.conf
static domain_name_servers=127.0.0.1"

Also, assume the DHCP in the network provides the Pi's address as the DNS server and DHCP server. A computer connects and is assigned 192.168.2.53. To use DNS, packets sent with source of 192.168.2.53 would send a DNS packet on port 53 to the destination in the 192.168.2.1 in the network, and 192.168.2.1 would reply to 192.168.2.53. So, no loop.

Packets with destinations other than 192.168.2.1 could be forwarded even if an intermediate hop is 192.168.2.1, right? Or, I think.

Addendum

The Pi router worked well enough to do some tests. Even with overclocking, the Pi was a major bottle neck. Using speedtedt.net the best speed I saw was 65Mb/s.

Starlink direct gets up to 150Mb/s.

So I am going to try some other things. Seeedstudio has some interesting hardware with openWRT preinstalled.

I would like to thank everyone who helped out. And I hope that this thread will be of some use to the community in the future.

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